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Monday28 July 2014

The newsdesk blog

The architecture of Detroit

Posted by: Andrea Klettner, Mon, 22 Jul 2013

Michigan Central Station, Detroit

Source: Andrea Klettner

 

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

The Packard Plant, Detroit

 

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

The Packard Plant, Detroit

 

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

The Packard Plant, Detroit

 

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

Central Michigan Station, Detroit

 

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

Obama filling station, Detroit

 

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

Michigan Central Station, Detroit

 

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

The Packard Plant, Detroit

 

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

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Source: Andrea Klettner

The Packard Plant, Detroit

 

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Source: Andrea Klettner

A little community theatre, Detroit

John Portman

The home of General Motors

Minoru Yamasaki

Source: Andrea Klettner

Minoru Yamasaki’s One Woodward Avenue, Detroit

Detroit Police HQ

Source: Andrea Klettner

Detroit Police HQ

Could you build an imaginary city?

Posted by: Andrea Klettner, Thu, 4 Jul 2013

Lisbon Triennale curator Liam Young is leading a workshop to finalise a giant hyper-real scale model, which will form one of the key elements of the Future Perfect show.

The model, originally built following Under Tomorrow’s Sky, a think tank held at MU Foundation Eindhoven in 2012, will be enhanced using 3D printing and resin cast buildings.

Workshop Futuro Perfeito

Source: © Susana Gaude^ncio.

Workshop Futuro Perfeito

If you’re interested in learning about this, and other things like lighting systems, fibre optics, detailed painting and graffiti then this workshop’s for you.

The whole workshop, located at the Palacio Sinel de Cordes in Lisbon, runs for two weeks between July 29 and August 9, ahead of the exhibition opening on September 12.

Enrol before July 14 and receive a €10 discount on the €175 cover price (€100 for one week). Email edu@trienaldelisboa.com

Workshop participants earn eight credits from the Portuguese Architects Guild.

Made in Chelsea

Posted by: elizabeth hopkirk, Tue, 21 May 2013

Trailfinders

Trailfinders’ Australian Garden with Studio 505’s Waratah Studio

The 100th Chelsea Flower Show to be held in the grounds of Christopher Wren’s Royal Hospital opens today.

Let Building Design’s newsdesk take you on a whistle-stop tour of the highlights.

First up is the Australian Garden (above and below) which showcases sustainable design with features including water capture.

The focal point is the startling geometric Waratah Studio perched on the top of the bank of indiginous plants. It was designed by Melbourne architects Studio 505 whose founders worked on that city’s Fed Square scheme. The digitally assembled petals are made from wood and let in a dappled light to the eyrie-esque structure.

Trailfinders

Trailfinders’ Australian Garden with Studio 505’s Waratah Studio

Trailfinders

Trailfinders’ Australian Garden with Studio 505’s Waratah Studio

Rubberneckers can see the studio from Chelsea Embankment even without a ticket.

Inside the vast marquee there are a couple of stands worth a mention. I was surprised to find one of the largest was created to celebrate Mecanoo’s £189m Library of Birmingham which opens in September.

 

Library of Birmingham stand

Library of Birmingham stand

Libraries and gardens are both good places to sit and contemplate but trying to combine the two makes for a rather bizarre display.

Library of Birmingham stand - with a video of Mecanoo

Library of Birmingham stand - with a video of Mecanoo’s design

The other three sides were devoted to Birmingham writers including poet Benjamin Zephaniah, who helpfully wrote Nature Trail in 2003, and JRR Tolkein whose Two Towers were depicted. 

The Library of Birmingham

The Library of Birmingham’s stand - one of Tolkein’s Two Towers

The Library of Birmingham

The Library of Birmingham’s stand - one of Tolkein’s Two Towers

Turn around and you find yourself in Thailand. The stand has a similarly fantastical feel, although it has a greater grounding in reality.

Thai stand

Thai stand

Outside, Stoke-on-Trent council’s landscape department was attracting a crowd for its potteries-themed stand. 

Stoke-on-Trent

Stoke-on-Trent’s kiln garden

Finally, here’s Prince Harry’s Forget-Me-Not garden, designed by Jinny Blom for his Sentebale charity in Lesotho.

Prince Harry

Prince Harry’s garden

Despite all this, the real highlight was getting a closer look at Wren’s grade I listed Royal Hospital.

Wren

Wren’s Royal Hospital Chelsea

 

Let's all go to the seaside!

Posted by: Andrea Klettner, Fri, 12 Apr 2013

The beach hut is a British institution, and they’ve looked the same (give or take a pot of pastel paint) for about 300 years.

beach huts

As they grow in popularity – last year one sold in Shaldon, Devon for £220,000 – an artist commissioned an international exhibition of more than 100 models of a beach hut for the 21st century.

“The beach hut is one of the few building forms which has been seriously overlooked by contemporary architects the world over,” says project curator Michael Trainor.

The Wizard of Oz by Lionel T Dean of design firm Future Factories

Source: Michael Trainor

The Wizard of Oz by Lionel T Dean of design firm Future Factories

“They are perceived as a treasured feature of our coastal landscape, as quintessentially British as fish and chips and the knotted hanky, but in reality are usually little more than a painted shed.”

The designs were first shown at the National Centre for Craft & Design in Sleaford, Lincolnshire and are now on show at the Aberystwyth Arts Centre as part of the Wales Festival of Architecture.

Oyster Pleasance, designed by the Beach Hut Salon team

Oyster Pleasance, designed by the Beach Hut Salon team

BH3 by Robin Jackson

BH3 by Robin Jackson

Becalmed by John Gilbert

Becalmed by John Gilbert

B Beauties at GWS 151 by E Egg

B Beauties at GWS 151 by E Egg

Could you be the next McArchitect?

Posted by: Andrea Klettner, Mon, 8 Apr 2013

For a few weeks last year London had the world’s largest McDonald’s restaurant, located on the 2012 Olympic Park.

The building was a one-off design by AEW Architects. It was praised by Design Council Cabe for being “striking” and despite its vastness, it provided a fairly good service to customers during the Games (partly because it only served medium-sized meals – no larging it up at the world’s biggest sporting event).

A few months on and McDonald’s is advertising for an architect director, based at its HQ in Oak Brook, Illinois.

 

World

World’s first McDonald’s in Des Plaines, Illinois

The job calls for a design leader that can align the architecture and design of the brand “across the areas of the world”, while ensuring global building standards and specs are met. Currently there are more than 34,000 restaurants worldwide. So, not an easy task.

McDonald

McDonald’s restaurant

McDonald’s last introduced a re-design in 2006 called ‘Forever Young’ – it’s first major revamp since the 1970s. The move called for flat roofs - no more sloping red - and resulted in a raft of McCafe’s and posher looking McDonald’s.

McCafe

Perhaps the restaurant thinks it’s time to move on from the faux Starbucks image, and go back to its more innovative roots.

McDonald's

McDonald’s

 

Rogues' Gallery

Posted by: elizabeth hopkirk, Mon, 18 Mar 2013

In the week that pop-up shops were hailed as the saviour of our dying high streets by the London Assembly, here’s an imaginative project in Chester.

For 11 days, a string of empty shops in the historic city has been appropriated by a group of performance, installation and digital artists.

Each has been assigned a premises and has responded imaginatively to the brief which was to celebrate Chester’s rich history as a shopping city.

Dubbed the Rogues, each has taken the name of an old trade, guild or shop and created a performance or installation work.

So we have Florence and her Machines, a cartoon launderette created by Carol Hanson in homage to coin-op launderettes of the past.

cartoon launderette

Source: roguesgalleries.co.uk

cartoon launderette

And Two Destination Language who have transformed an empty shop into a living room. Each visitor is invited to stay as long as they wish, in return for a story and the opportunity to buy one of their worldly possessions.

Performance artist Anoushka Athique has recreated a haberdashery, Repair Stations, where she repairs audience members’ items in exchange for a story. Over the course of the festival the stories are being collated into a giant textile map.

Bat Studio, a collaboration by David Di Duca and Jonty Craig who met at the Bartlett, created Heard Words, a modern-day scriveners  office where visitors’ conversations are (mis-)transcribed.

And Kate Davies, inspired by Chester’s leather tanning trade and the tradition of shoemaking, has created a soundscape drawing on historical links to local streets and shops.

“Rather than having a number of unsightly empty shops which can often repel shoppers, this scheme, we hope, will bring potential customers into the town centre,” said Amber Knipe, programme manager of Chester Performs.

“In a City with some of the oldest shopping streets in the country, Rogues’ Galleries sets out to celebrate the independence of thought and artistry that make up our communities. It also addresses the struggles the high street has with homogeneous brands and the effect this has on original thought.”

Costermonger chess

Source: roguesgalleries.co.uk

Costermonger chess

I only wish I could get to Chester before it comes to an end. But the BD editorial team did enjoy a memorable day out at the Folkestone Triennial in 2011 where one of the installations involved some similarly imaginative takeovers of empty shops.

What are the rest of our towns waiting for?

Rogues’ Galleries runs until March 24. For more information visit www.roguesgalleries.co.uk

 

Lights, Camera, Action

Posted by: Cate St Hill, Mon, 18 Mar 2013

When a model walks down a catwalk all eyes focus on her, but the designs wouldn’t have nearly as much impact if it wasn’t for the showspaces in which they are set.

Catwalk shows are getting bigger and bigger, with brands cashing in on the ability to broadcast a show live to thousands of people across the world, and turn them into potential customers at the click of a button. Louis Vuitton had models coming down full scale escalators last year, while Karl Lagerfeld used a working merry-go-round for Chanel’s 2008 show.

Rem Koolhaas’s thinktank AMO (part of OMA) has a longstanding relationship with Prada. AMO unveiled a furniture collection for an ‘ideal house’ at Prada’s menswear show earlier this year at Milan Fashion Week. Models weaved through the domestic set, where geometric furniture, objects and manifestations of everyday life appeared atop an irregularly shaped central island. A series of images were projected onto multiple window frames showing outdoor scenes and interior visions. The show used furniture from an upcoming collection for furniture manufacturer Knoll, which debuts at the Milan Furniture Fair in April.

'The Ideal House' by AMO for Prada

Source: Giovanna Silva

‘The Ideal House’ by AMO for Prada

AMO has designed sets for Prada since January 2004. For the Spring/Summer 2012 menswear, guests were greeted by a sea of blue foam seats, and the show in 2009 was placed on an archipelago of timber islands that demarcated the runway. In 2011, they designed an elevated metal grille stage, surrounded by stadium-style seating, and in 2007 there was a Bauhaus-style showspace with plain grey benches. You can see a full timeline of their showspaces at Wallpaper magazine.

Spring/Summer 2007 menswear showspace by AMO

Spring/Summer 2007 menswear showspace by AMO

Prada Spring/Summer 2012 Menswear showspace

Prada Spring/Summer 2012 Menswear showspace

Spring/Summer 2009 menswear showspace

Spring/Summer 2009 menswear showspace

Spring/Summer 2011 Prada showspace

Spring/Summer 2011 Prada showspace

Closer to home, London-based 42 Architects are making a name for themselves with the showspaces for Topshop and Topman during London Fashion Week. Their latest show in February was set in the newly opened Tate Modern Tanks, recently brought to life by Herzog and de Meuron. Besides the Topshop show, the space also played host to Simone Rocha, Louise Gray and Meadham Kirchhoff to name a few.

Topman showspace by 42 Architects

Topman showspace by 42 Architects

Topman showspace by 42 Architects

Topman showspace by 42 Architects

Johan Berglund of 42 Architects explained their concept: “Acknowledging the powerful spatial experience the space itself holds, we decided to only create structures that would complement or highlight the qualities of the space designed by Herzog and de Meuron.

“Based on the initial ideas in the brief from Topshop, we developed the designs around two themes: the photographic sequences of Edward Muybridge, capturing movement through space, and the historical use of the Tate Tanks as oil storage facilities.”

Topshop 2013 showspace by 42 Architects

Topshop 2013 showspace by 42 Architects

42 Architects designed a large curved wall, clad in a high gloss black PVC finish, for the entrance into the showspace. It referenced the history of oil in the tanks and cast reflections with carefully positioned graphics and light. During the show, a series of panoramic projections captured the models and projectd them onto the tanks spaces as a sequence of still images.

Topshop 2013 showspace by 42 Architects

Topshop 2013 showspace by 42 Architects

The practice also created a temporary spiralling installation for Topshop’s press launch in 2011. The timeframe of the project was only three weeks, from conception to completion. A sweeping black form compiled of hand-formed PVC coated tubes wrapped itself around the room and provided hanging space for clothes.

Berglund said: “Twister proposes a spatial configuration built of swirls, swooshes, vortexes and eddys. Visitors are invited to follow the structure as it winds through the room, while encountering concentrations of displayed garments along the way.”

Johan Berglund with Twister for the Topshop Press Space 2011

Johan Berglund with Twister for the Topshop Press Space 2011

Topshop Press Space 2011

Topshop Press Space 2011

42 Architect’s relationship with Topshop is set to continue, and they’ve already held discussions about the next Topman showspace.  Setting the show in the Tate Tanks marked an effort by the high street brand to match its shows to the likes of Prada, Louis Vuitton and Chanel. In previous years Topshop has created a pop-up tent in Bedford Square next to the neighbouring Architectural Association, and they have even used the old Eurostar station in Waterloo. So what’s next?

By Cate St. Hill

Cate is currently an intern at Bdonline and BD and looks after our Book Club and Project News as well as First Look.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Talkin' ‘bout the next generation

Posted by: elizabeth hopkirk, Tue, 12 Mar 2013

 

A permanent building site opens in Bristol later this month.

It’s not some over-ambitious development mothballed by the recession, but a hands-on exhibit at the At-Bristol science centre.

Build It!’s giant building blocks and climbable scaffolding is aimed at children under eight.

Build It! at At-Bristol science centre

Source: At-Bristol

Build It! at At-Bristol science centre

They will be encouraged to work together to decide where the windows should go, how many tiles are needed and whether everyone is working safely.

Like the education work of Open City, this project should be celebrated.

The kids who use it won’t all grow up to become architects (it wouldn’t be good for them or for you if they did, given the state of the profession).

But some of them might become clients. And whatever walk of life they end up in, a generation that has grown up thinking about and being excited by buildings is something we desperately need.

As the founder of a similar hands-on programme in Egypt put it: “It isn’t necessarily about preparing kids to become future architects, but to get them acquainted with architecture from a new perspective and with new outcomes.”

Rania al-Basty is one of the founders of Mini Architect, a programme designed to help children master daily life skills by “seeing the world through architecture”.

Mini Architect

Source: Egypt Independent

Mini Architect

“We noticed that our work as architects has positively impacted our own children, and they were eager to explore more about the basis of architecture and processes of design,” she said.

There are workshops on building your own town, earth-friendly design and architecture through the senses which help children learn observation, listening, cooperation, negotiation and decision-making skills that help them understand the culture and community they live in.

“Throughout the workshops, kids discover their surroundings, appreciate the value of good design in the creation of a high-quality built environment, get inspired, and then start to create their own masterpieces with their hands,” Basty told the Egypt Independent.

Bravo!

 

Projects showcased at Mipim 2013

Posted by: Cate St Hill, Tue, 12 Mar 2013

Mons Beyond the Walls, Belgium

Mons Beyond The Walls, Mons, Belgium

Architect: Santiago Calatrava and Daniel Libeskind

Masterplanned by Santiago Calatrava, this project connects the historic town centre of Mons in Belgium, with a new town currently under construction. The plans feature a convention centre designed by Daniel Libeskind, a 120 bedroom hotel by Architects + SL and ADM, as well as over 10,000 sq m of office space and 43,800 sq m of housing. All of the buildings will be heated by geothermal energy. 

Carlsberg City District, Denmark

Source: Luxigon

Carslberg City District, Copenhagen, Denmark

Architect: Luxigton

Paris and Los Angeles-based Luxigon has designed a new campus for The University College Capital on the site of the former Carlsberg Brewery in the heart of Copenhagen. The 330,000 sq m Brewery site features Carlsberg’s global headquarters, a museum and research centre, and a visitor centre. In the next 20 years, the entire site will be transformed into a multifunctional and sustainable city district, including private homes, sports venues, cultural centres and offices. The University campus will open in 2016. 

Copenhagen Port Company House, Copenhagen, Denmark

Architect: DesignGroup Architects
Located in part of the Copenhagen Harbour called Nordhavnen, this project by DesignGroup Architects, aims to transform the former run-down port into a sustainable city district. The old cement stores will be converted into 13,000 sq m of offices, with a 360 degree view of the surrounding harbour. The upper levels will feature a canteen, conference and meetings rooms, as well as a roof terrace. The building aims for Breeam Very Good certificate. It is due to open in July 2014. 

Hikari, Lyon, France

Architect: Kengo Kuma Associates

Designed by Kengo Kuma, Hikari is a 12,800 sq m development in Lyon consisting of three buildings containing offices, housing and retail space. The buildings are interlinked to pool their energy production and make the development more energy efficient. The scheme is due to finish in early 2015.

The Public Service Hall, Georgia

The Public Service Hall (PSH), Zugdidi, Georgia

Architect: Baena Casemor Arquitectes BCQ

Spanish Architects Baena Casemor has designed a new law court next to the Central Park in Zugdidi, Georgia. The new building is arranged on three floors, with a front office and meeting rooms on the ground floor, and a prosecutor’s office on the second floor. 

Upper West Kurfurstendamm, Germany

Upper West Kurfurstendamm, Berlin, Germany

Architect: Langhof Architekten

This high-rise building will mark the beginning of Kurfurstendamm in the centre of the western part of Berlin. The building features offices, hotel and retail space. Construction will start this year and be finished in 2016. 

Milano Santa Giulia, Milan, Italy

Architect: Foster + Partners

This development aims to create a new urban centre in the south-east of Milan. The 400,000 sq m project features a balance of housing and office and commercial space.  At the ehart of the development is a 490 metre-long promenade featuring a tramline, landscaping and a series of public squares. 

The Deloitte building, Norway

The Deloitte building, Oslo, Norway 

Architect: MVRDV, A-lab and Dark

Dutch architects MVRDV has teamed up with Norway-based A-lab and Dark to design a headquarters for Deloitte in Oslo. The building is situated in a 20,000 sq m masterplan that features housing, office buildings, retail space, restaurants, and cultural institutions, parks and a harbour promenade. The Deloitte HQ houses 2 floors of shops and refreshments with 9 storeys of office space, and a conference suite and terraces on the upper levels. It is due to finish in December. 

Chopin Airport City, Poland

Chopin Airport City, Warsaw, Poland

Architect: JEMS Architekci 

Polish JEMS Architekci has designed a new office and retail complex next to Chopin Airport in the heart of Warsaw. The project features office buildings, a conference centre, as well as luxury hotels and recreation facilities, spread across an area of 170,000 sq m. The buildings will be surrounded by landscaping and a road system and trainline to the city centre and other parts of Poland.

Mebe One Khimki Plaza, Khimki, Russian Federation

Architect: John McAslan + Partners

Located in the city of Khimki, this new 19-storey business centre features 31,000 sq m of office space, alongside a cafe and gallery space on the ground floor and a restaurant on the first floor. The building is designed to reach Leed Gold standard and is due to finish in 2014. 

Yongsan IBD Block H, South Korea

Yongsan IBD Block H, Seoul, South Korea

Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates and Samoo Architects & Engineers

This new building in Seoul sits in the Yongsan International Business District, a new urban centre for business, entertainment and shopping. The project features a luxury hotel and a high-end serviced residential building. A tower rising to 385 metres contains a casino, retail and spa in the basement, and a large banquet hall for the hotel. It is scheduled to finish in 2016. 

Istanbloom, Turkey

Istanbloom, Istanbul, Turkey

Architect: DB Architects

DB Architects has designed a mixed-use tower in the city centre of Istanbul, overlooking the Bosphorus. The 46-storey tower features residential units and 3 floors of office space. The building also has retail space, parking, and entrance hall with lounge and a spa. The project is expected to finish this year.

One Nine Elms, UK

One Nine Elms, Vauxhall, London

Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

Located at the heart of a new cluster of tall buildings in Vauxhall, One Nine Elms features two towers of 200 metres and 160 metres. The building occupies a prominent location on London’s riverside and acts as the gateway to a proposed park. The two towers hold 487 residential units with office and hotel accommodation at the lower levels, and a roof gardens at the upper levels. When completed, One Nine Elms will be the tallest residential development in Western Europe. 

Sixty London, UK

Sixty London, Holborn, London

Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

Sixty London is a commercial office development located on Holborn Viaduct, which will provide 19,510 sq m of office space. An important element of the development is the reconstruction of a Victorian gatehouse which was demolished in the late 1960s. Construction has started on site and is due to finish this summer. 

The Hydro Arena, Glasgow, Scotland

Architect: Foster + Partners

Due to be completed this September, Glasgow’s new arena will hold 12,000 seated and will be the largest entertainment venue in Scotland. Modelled on Greek and Roman amphitheatres, the 45-metre tall building with its distinctive dome will stand higher than its neighbour, the Armadillo. 

Airport Business Park, Uruguay

Airport Business Park, Uruguay 

Architect: LV arquitectura

Located in Canelones, in front of Carrasco International Airport, this 35,000 sq m development features office buildings, high-end retail stores, a business hotel, a food court, warehouses, and a conference centre and event rooms. 

837 Washington, United States

837 Washington, New York, United States

Architect: Morris Adjmi

Located in the Meatpacking District, 837 Washington is a mixed-use retail and commercial development designed by New York-based Morris Adjmi. The building features a glass and steel addition to an existing 1930s warehouse. 

Designing for Champions

Posted by: Andrea Klettner, Tue, 5 Mar 2013

RIBA president Angela Brady has premiered the first version of her video to showcase the input architects and engineers had into the 2012 London Olympic games.

Featuring the designers behind the Olympic cauldron, the Basketball Arena, the Velodrome, the Coca-Cola Beatbox and the Soundforms outdoor concert venue – the eight minute film has been shown for the first time at Ecobuild.

“This film is a snapshot of the 52 interviews we recorded which we hope to feature in a 1 hour documentary to include the transformation of the Olympic Park into legacy mode to benefit the local community,” said Brady.

The film was the result of a campaign led by Brady, Peter Murray from the NLA and John Nolan from the Institute for Structural Engineers.

It will be shown at Mipim in Cannes on Tuesday, March 12 at 4.50pm on the London stand.

See the film here.

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